Research/ Disclaimer

Disclaimer

The information presented on this site is not intended as medical advice. The content of this site is for information purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, prevent, treat or cure any illness. Always consult your doctor before starting any complementary treatment.

If you are pregnant, or taking medication, or receiving health care treatment for any condition, always consult your physician before trying any complementary or alternative therapy.

While the information contained within the site is periodically updated, no guarantee is given that the information provided in this website is correct, complete, and/or up-to-date.

No claims are made by Healing Hands Therapy concerning clinical success or scientific research/studies for any therapy mentioned.

Links to external websites are for interest only, and we do not accept responsibility for the content of any website links.

Were clients have experienced help and relief from their conditions, this is a personal development and a personal opinion that it has helped with there condition .

Research

Aromatherapy

In practice aromatherapy is very safe, apart from occasional allergic reactions. There’s lis evidence that aromatherapy is effective and beneficial in  painful conditions and helpful with anxiety. Many people with chronic pain report that an aromatherapy massage gives relief for several weeks

Reference :http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/complementary-and-alternative-medicines/complementary-therapies/aromatherapy.aspx

Massage

Massage involves a manual technique in which a rhythmic movement uses a variety of strokes, kneading or tapping to move your muscles and soft tissue of your body. Massage can be stimulating or sedating, vigorous or gentle, and can include your whole body or only part. The therapist may use oils, creams, lotions or talcum powder. Massage can reduce your anxiety and stress levels, relieve muscular tension and fatigue, improve circulation and thus reduce your pain levels. –

See more at: http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/complementary-and-alternative-medicines/complementary-therapies/massage.aspx#sthash.FO62E7YT.dpuf

Pregnancy Reflexology

Dr Gowri Motha, Ms Zia Rowji and Dr Jane McGrath

In 1992-93, reflexology was offered free of cost to 64 pregnant women from 20 weeks of pregnancy to term, in Forest Gate, London.  Thirty-seven completed the set course of 10 treatments.
The remaining group found that reflexology helped with the following presenting problems:

table3

It was discovered that the effects of reflexology on labour outcomes were outstanding. Some had labour times of only 2 hours, some 3 hours. The 2025 year olds had an average time of first stage labour of 5 or 6 hours, as did the first time mothers (text book average is 16-24 hours).  Second time mothers, 2630 year olds, seemed to have longer labours (and may have fallen into the group experiencing more social stress). The second stage of labour lasted an average of 16 minutes (compared to the text book expectancy of 1-2 hours). In this small study it was found that there was very little difference between the labour times of 30 year olds and 40 year olds, even though many of the 40 year olds were first time mothers (who had 23 hour labours).

Outcomes for mothers receiving reflexology in the study

table4

In a separate study in an antenatal clinic, Dr Motha had found that weekly reflexology treatments of between 30 to 45 minutes normalised hypertension, avoiding the usual hospital admittance for 48 hours rest and observation.
Other benefits of reflexology in pregnancy include:

  • Providing a sense of well-being and helping to prevent problems from starting
  • Reducing swelling in feet and ankles
  • Relieving tired, aching feet
  • Improving sleep quality
  • Aiding digestion

Creating a sense of well-being for the foetus

Supporting the mother mentally, physically and emotionally throughout pregnancy

Reflexology during labour can intensify contractions and shortens labour as a result

Chronic headache

We studied the effects of acupuncture and massage with relaxation upon chronic headache. Sufferers were assigned to either acupuncture or massage with relaxation instead of a change to their prescribed medication.

In both treatments there was a significant improvement in pain, but migraine patients treated by massage with relaxation showed significantly greater improvements compared with those patients who received acupuncture.

Wylie KR et al. Does psychological testing help to predict the response to acupuncture or massage/relaxation therapy in patients presenting to a general neurology clinic with headache? Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine 17(2): 130-9. Jun 1997

http://www.bmj.com/rapid-response/2011/10/31/relaxation-and-massage-often-helpful

 Lower back pain

The Federation of Holistic Therapists FHT (www.fht.org.uk/Home/Our_Treatments/Popular_treatments/) states: Despite being used for many years, massage is only now building a body of clinical evidence to support its use in the healthcare arena. Guidelines recently published by the National Institute for Clinical Evidence (NICE) recommends that patients with persistent, non-specific low back pain have access to a choice of different treatments, including massage. The NICE guidelines state “The effect of massage on patients with chronic low back pain lasted at least a year after the end of treatment.”

*Saving P, et al (May 2009). Low Back Pain: early management of persistent non-specific low back pain. London: National Collaborating Center for Primary Care and Royal College of General Practitioners . Available from the NICE website at: www.nice.org.uk

You may also find the NHS evidence website useful
http://www.evidence.nhs.uk/search.aspx?t=massage

 

Manual lymphatic drainage

(MLD) is a type of gentle massage which is intended to encourage the natural drainage of the lymph from the tissues space body. The lymph system depends on intrinsic contractions of the smooth muscle cells in the walls of lymph vessels (peristalsis) and the movement of skeletal muscles to propel lymph through the vessels to lymph nodes and then beyond the lymph nodes to the lymph ducts which return lymph to the cardiovascular system. Manual lymph drainage uses a specific amount of pressure (less than 9 ounces per square inch) and rhythmic circular movements to stimulate lymph flow.[

MLD is now recognized as a primary tool in lymphedema management. Therapists can today receive certification through special classes conducted by various organizations specializing in MLD, or through a complete lymphedema treatment certification course.[2] Scientific studies show mixed results regarding the efficacy of the method in treating lymphedema and further studies are needed.[3] A 2009 meta-analysis of studies in the area of sports medicine and rehabilitation showed best evidence of effectiveness for Manual lymphatic drainage treatment to “enzyme serum levels associated with acute skeletal muscle cell damage as well as reduction of edema [swelling] around broken bones.” [4] A 2013 systematic review of manual lymphatic drainage with regard to breast cancer related lymphedema found no clear support for the effectiveness of the intervention in either preventing limb edema in at risk women or treating women for the condition.[5]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manual_lymphatic_drainage

Hopi ear candles

It certainly delivered. I had just suffered from a bout of sinusitis so, rather than having my usual spa treat of a facial or massage, I chose a Hopi Ear Candling session

If you’re suffering with sinus problems or even hayfever, I’d wholeheartedly recommend putting aside any reservations you may have and giving it a go.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1392119/Treatment-week-Suffering-sinus-problems-hayfever-Opt-ear-candling.html#ixzz2tDzsMr1q